Tversky

Promotional photographs
by Ferran Capo

Art Direction & Photography: Ferran Capo
Set Art Direction: Sandra Marin
Styling: Cris Quer
Make-up: Javier Ceferino
Photo Assists: Valerie Steenhaut & Luna Callís

Tversky is a future-funk duo living in Barcelona that I got to know through a mutual friend. I listened to some songs my mate recommended and thought they had something special. Their music was catchy. It was electronic, but they also played instruments. And that was already something. Besides, they sang, which wasn’t bad either. I have nothing against producers, but I liked the fact they weren’t just two guys behind their MacBooks, but people who played sax live, and sang… It’s a different approach to the most general one.

We first talked about directing a music video for them, but during our first conversations came up their need to have new promotional photographs. I thought it would be best to start with the photographs to get to know them better. For a while I’d been wanting to be in charge of the art direction and photography of a project and it seemed like a good idea.

What I wanted was to take photographs that didn’t look too much like stuff I keep on seeing everywhere, most of all in local festivals promo materials. I thought there was room to experiment a little and do something different; I wanted the photographs to be powerful and different, more than just portraits, but for them to be also useful as promotional material for the band.

I wanted to do something with long exposures and lots of colour lights.

I wanted the space to be abstract, conceptual, for people not to understand too well what it was. Some kind of abandoned warehouse of a stranded tropical spaceship that accumulated electronic trash; something like the living room of an abandoned house turned game room for drug-addict bikers from the Clown band in Akira. A modernist living room but with a central piece that was deconstructed and made up of chairs. Contrasting concepts, modernism against deconstructivism. Flowers, plants and craftsmanship against plastic and industrial pieces. Plastic, metal and neon. Ai Weiwei makes out with Takashi Ito. William Gibson is happy.

Photographs entailed quite a lot of work. We decided to use long exposures and play with light sequences at different times to illuminate the different elements and shots. Flash and general light for them, neon and LED strips for the background and, lastly, painting with lights taking advantage of the dark. Each photograph took around 15 seconds so the whole process was long and painstaking.

I love colour. I don’t do very sober things. I think there are already lots of people who do serious, Swiss, and sober things. So I was looking for saturated colours, chaos, tropical palm trees, lots of colour, coloured shadows, thick blacks and an absorbed attitude, almost like that of mad scientists or nerds.

To me, these pictures are great. The world is round, for all I know, and I also live in a world where men slip on banana peels. Fuck the world.